How To Write An About Page People Actually Want to Read

Aside from your homepage, the About Page is often the second most popular page read when a visitor lands on your website. The greatest problem I see with the majority of About Pages I come across is the lack of 1) in-depth coverage of what the company stands for (or does) and 2) a sense of shyness around who works for the company.

With your About Page being such an important step in the retention of a visitor, it’s safe to say that what you write there will leave a lasting impression. Too little information and the potential customer may lack trust in your abilities or not relate to you. Too much information and they might be overwhelmed and not make it to the end of the page.

Today I’m sharing my favorite About Page method alongside some simple tips to keep your About Page both interesting and informative.

about-page-formula-brand-story-brandpsyche

Before I Share the Formula, Let’s Define Your Goals

There are a couple of key factors you always want to highlight when creating an About Page:

  • What the company does

  • What the company stands for (e.g. values)

  • How the company relates to its customers

  • Who the people are

What I see most often is:

  • The company will either share too much or too little regarding what it does

  • The company will either have a mission statement or not

  • The company will speak in industry jargon or not clearly define what it does

  • The company will share only their executive leadership bios or worse, no bios at all

About Pages do not have to be static, lifeless things. In fact, creating a page that has no real meaning can actually be worse for your brand than not having one at all.

So why does a potential customer visit your About Page?

From an obvious perspective, they want to get to know the people - and company - they may spend money with. If someone is about to purchase a service or product from your website they will make sure they not only trust but fully understand your company’s mission, values and objectives. They want to know who they are doing business with and in the end, if it makes them feel good.

Remember, it’s all about them, not you.

Another reason they visit is because they are intrigued or value your work. Perhaps they found your blog and love your writing style and advice. Or maybe they met you at a networking event and they want a more in-depth look at who and what you stand for. Maybe they love a service or product but want to make sure you have the experience to back up what you promise in your sales page.

Whatever the case may be, the About Page is your opportunity to showcase your authority, credibility, uniqueness, and core values.

Remember, the About Page is about them - not you. The customer or client will always be referencing back to themselves when reading about your experience, credentials and reason for being. Whatever context you share on the About Page has nothing to do with the your company but everything to do with your customer’s needs and problems.

Breathe life into your brand.

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The Step-by-Step About Page Formula

Before we begin, I’d like to acknowledge how difficult many people find it to authentically write (or talk) about themselves without sounding pretentious or sleazy. While I know it’s not common to be taught to write about ourselves, hopefully this formula will ease that discomfort.

1 | Create Relevance

Your first sentence should be who you are, what you do and who you work with. By positioning yourself this way, the visitor will get a sense from the get-go whether or not you can help or solve their problems. By sharing this first you create a sense of authority and credibility, creating trust that will keep them reading.

2 | Stand For Something

How are you (or your company) different? Why should anyone care? What differentiates you? What do you stand for? What makes you special? Here’s where your mission and values can be shared or simply a point of view. Whether it’s perspective, technique, material or a vision - whatever drives the company needs to be shared here.

3 | Where It All Started

Why are you doing what you are doing? What prompted you to take the leap, start the company, do the work? This doesn’t need to be a re-telling of your life’s story but if there’s something that particularly stands out - and is relevant to how you are here today - share it! By taking your visitor on a small journey to the heart of your company you better position yourself as a company they’ll want to invest their money in (over those lifeless, personality-devoid guys).

4 | The Rollercoaster Ride

Ups, downs, twists and dives...this is what makes a riveting tale. No journey is a straight line, especially in business. Connect the dots for your readers to better grasp what you’ve been through and understand where you are going. Demonstrate how you’ve survived, what you’ve done to overcome the hurdles and they’ll love you even more for it.

5 | The Nitty Gritty

Creating a tantalizing tale is one thing but what about the proof that you actually know what you are talking about? Here you’ll find space to add those fancy titles, groups, degrees, and associations you belong to. Remember, this is to reinforce your credibility and authority in the eyes of the customer - NOT to show off.

6 | Remember to Be Human

You’ve given them a story, shared your experience and now you can finish with a little human speak. Sharing your favorite past-time, what you do in your downtime, a unique hobby or skill can all be worthwhile here. The goal - aside from informing your customer in how you help them - is to help the customer feel comfortable giving you their money. Where their trust flows, their cash goes.

7 | Finally, Guide Them

Whatever you do, don’t leave them hanging! End your about section with a clear call to action. Where should they go from here? An insider tip: avoid sending them straight to a sales page. By always positioning yourself as a problem-solver, you’ll naturally draw visitors to your sales page. Do it too soon and you’ll look money-hungry without proving your worth first. A typical call to action might be a link to your articles, service page (not individual sales page) or a community you’ve created online. It could also be an invitation to join a newsletter or forum that provides even more value (while avoiding sales pitches).

Need an example of this formula in action? Take a peek at my About Page for inspiration.

Tried this formula and want an extra pair of eyes on it? Share the full link below in the comments (no shortened links please) and I’ll provide feedback.